Date completed : 26 January 2018 Duration : 10 Months
Sophie Younger

The carpet was too large (5.32 x 4.93 m), too difficult and structurally too unsound to remove, so we were obliged to work in-situ, stitching with a curved needle lying on the floor – for over two weeks. We don’t often face such a challenge. The Victorian/Edwardian seamed floor covering was of traditional design, however the looped and cut pile was machine-made, sandwiched in place by a tightly woven structure of bast/linen and possibly woollen threads.

To make the carpet look more structurally complete a decision was taken to in-fill the holes (some large) using the traditional transfer technique of ‘prick and pounce’, transferring most of the missing design elements onto canvas, rather than using a plain coloured patch. The canvas was pre-selected for its weight and weave structure and we ensured that the fabric paints chosen were of good ‘rub-ability’ and light fastness. Conservation stitching techniques were robustly executed with a curved needle and any loose threads were threaded to the back out of harm’s way.

 

Study Carpet, Historic House
Study Carpet, Historic House
Study Carpet, Historic House
Study Carpet, Historic House
Study Carpet, Historic House
Study Carpet, Historic House

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